Christmas 2014

December 22, 2014

Christmas 2014

Merry Christmas to all….

Having just re-read our 2013 Christmas letter, we acknowledge that some of what we thought “might happen” didn’t, and we certainly didn’t foresee all that did. We suppose that’s not much different than each of your lives.

For those of you who just skim Christmas letters, because you just can’t take all the “good news”, here is the executive summary:

  • Ron hasn’t yet figured out what it means to retire – even though he is trying.
  • Martha is an organizer and Ron hanging around the house during the daytime does not make for “good organization”.
  • Our bucket list hasn’t changed one bit.
  • We are beginning to adjust, or at least, fit into a church.
  • Ron managed to troubleshoot an electrical problem in our house. Yes, once he figured it out he strutted around the house like a proud rooster.

Now for those that want a bit more detail, here goes…..

Ron has been working almost full-time with MCC on a variety of projects, some in his wheelhouse, others not so much. The projects which have been completed include the creation of a full-time IT service position, recruiting and hiring a person to fill this role. This was especially important for MCC, as it is with most NGOs, an increasing reliance on technology in order to communicate, fund raise, as well as answer questions from donors. With this project completed, Ron was given the task of putting together the Grand Opening of the newly built MCC Centre. Event planning is not in Ron’s wheel house so it was a bit of a challenge. Ron admits to wanting to assign this to someone, but turns out that was not an option so he operated outside of his wheelhouse for a while.

Ron is currently involved in assisting new MCC Representatives in NE Asia so will be travelling to the area early in the new year. He is also involved in the preparation for the implementation of a HRIS system. (Human Resource Information System) and continues with some MCC BC management and program projects.

Martha has accomplished much in the house and yard, doing many of the things that others did for us, or helped us with, during the years we lived in Kenya.  There are still a few projects that need doing, many of them have been done. She was a bit concerned as Ron tackled the above mentioned “electrical issue”. However, no electrocutions, no short outs, maybe a tripped breaker, but nothing more serious.

We have been attending Sardis Community Church, have joined a small group study, and have begun to develop some relationships. While not yet “all in”, we are on the way.

There is a saying that, “once in Africa, Africa stays with you”. This is also our experience and we remain interested in the news of the continent, the politics of individual nations, and we enjoy Facebook enabling us to stay somewhat updated with our friends. We enjoy rereading our weekly BLOG posted during our 5 years on the continent. Some of those posts were lame J

We are grateful to God that we have, and are, enjoying good health and so happy to be on the same continent and in the same country as our children and grandchildren which allows us to see them a bit more often. We hope that you get to spend time with family during the Christmas Season.

Peace on earth, goodwill to all, was the message of the angels and is our prayer and wish for you.

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca

Our family picture taken summer of 2014

Our family picture taken summer of 2014

Retirement -- Indeed!!

Retirement — Indeed!!

Christmas 2013

December 14, 2013

The end of December 2013 marks the 4 month anniversary of our return after five years in Kenya. This will no doubt be the last direct reference to our MCC Kenya term but the effects of our term will remain with us. In response to the repeated question of “so – how are you adjusting to life in Canada?” our answer has been:

–       We are not sure we have adjusted. So far our life has taken many turns. Martha’s mother went to her home in glory shortly after our return. We had our belongings moved from Alberta to B.C. – there were some surprises in the container of belongings that we did not remember. There have been a series of projects in our house, some travel (see next topic re Haiti), visiting with family and friends, visiting churches as we look for a church home.
– Ask us again in February when we think we will be able to answer this question more coherently.

As we write this BLOG we are in Millet, Alberta, at the home of Tim and Joanne. Tim and Jo welcomed Eva Ruth on December 4th and we joined them on Dec. 10th to “help” them with care for Eva and her siblings. As you can see, this is strenuous exercise. 🙂

Eva Ruth and Grandma Martha

Eva Ruth and Grandma Martha and Grandpa R2

Eva and Grandpa R2

It has been especially good to connect with each of our children and their families. We are within a one day drive of each of them and we intend to use our vehicle to make regular trips to each. (assuming that we will be invited J)

Ron’s participation in the MCC Haiti country review was an educational experience:

–       how MCC works with partners and participants spans borders. Many of the quotes and comments received from the people and organizations interviewed in Haiti coincided with comments made by partners in Kenya. While this is but a small sample of two, it would be fair to say that in the 60+ countries where MCC serves, the observations are predictable. These include:

  • MCC has a horizontal relationship with the partners and participants (beneficiaries)
  • MCC is flexible.
  • MCC keeps it’s word (we really like this one)
  • MCC stays for the long-term – in Haiti the January 12, 2010 earthquake response encompasses at least five years and many of the interventions are designed to be self-sustainable.
  • MCC does this as a calling – as part of the response of the church.
  • And, many more.

One coincidental side-note –  the people that took our place in Kenya as MCC Reps, served in Haiti some years ago and were still remembered by several of the MCC Haiti national staff.

We will spend time between Christmas and New Years at a Kopp family reunion at Camp Evergreen http://www.camp-evergreen.com/drupal/.

We  wish for each of you a meaningful advent season, a reflective Christmas and a joyous and blessed New Year.

Peace on earth, goodwill to all.

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca

Re-entry to North America

October 26, 2013

It is now a little over two months since we left Kenya after working there with MCC for five years. To see what we were doing there, please see previous weekly posts.

Not only have these last two months been a time of re-entry they have also been the start of the “retirement chapter” of our lives. This strikes home when we are asked on various forms (health, insurance, conveyancing documents, etc.) what our occupation is, and the only thing left from possible choices is “retired”. We do not intend that the word retirement equates with inactivity. These past few months have certainly been active.

Some of these activities, albeit mundane activities, include:
– visiting Amsterdam with Ron’s brother and his wife was a nice transition before arriving in North America.
– the morning after our arrival in Vancouver, we went to see our house. We then tried to get most of the essential applications done (drivers license, health coverage, conveyancing for house, phone numbers, financial stuff, and seeing Ron’s mom and the rest of the family, buying a car…).
– Five days after our arrival we drove to Coaldale to see Martha’s mom. We arrived after supper on Thursday (Sept. 5th) and got the chance to visit with her on Friday morning. We drove to Calgary to meet with the MCC Alberta team and also to see our second daughter and family. The following morning (Sat), Martha’s sister called from Coaldale to say that Mom Kopp was deteriorating so Martha drove back to Coaldale while Ron stayed with family in Calgary.
– Martha’s mom passed away on Tuesday morning, Sept 10th. Martha and several of her sisters were able to be with her to the end. Never easy.
– Mom Kopp’s funeral, held on Monday, was a celebratory occasion. The vast majority of her large family was able to attend and we all celebrated God’s faithfulness in the life of Mom Kopp.
– We left Coaldale a few days later for Edmonton to visit Joanne and her family. This visit was shorter than planned because we also needed to prepare for the movement of our goods from Alberta to B.C.
– Ron attended and spoke on a panel at the MCC Canada AGM in Winnipeg — Sept 20 and 21.
– The movement of our goods from Alberta to B.C. went relatively smoothly with our goods arriving in Chilliwack on Sept 25th and we were there to receive the goods.
– Since then we have spent Canadian Thanksgiving with Dana and her family on Vancouver Island, found a doctor, dentist, audiologist, optometrist and had all the necessary work done on these ageing bodies.
– We are trimming hedges, pruning trees, power washing driveways, installing sound systems and doing all kinds of projects while the weather is still warm.

Vedder River a short distance from our house

Vedder River a short distance from our house

We have a number of projects on the go — all related to moving into this house and getting the yard and house “complete”.

So, you might still be asking, how is our re-entry going? Our answer is – we haven’t re-entered yet. Yes, we are no longer in Kenya, but we do not yet feel as if we are settled in Canada. This will happen as we find a church home, renew friendships and make new friends.

The weather has been gorgeous and we know that this cannot last so we work on our outdoor projects hoping to complete them before the weather deteriorates.

We would be remiss if we did not mention the enormous help that Dave and Janet – Ron’s brother and his wife – have been to us as we settle in Chilliwack. The list is endless of the help that have provided. From recommendations, to home improvement project assistance, and friendship, we are thankful for all this.

In front of Kevin and Dana's house in Chemainus

In front of Kevin and Dana’s house in Chemainus

Our short term plans include:
– hosting an “African peace update” dinner with Jimmy Juma.
– MCC Haiti country review participation for Ron
– family gatherings in a week (Ron’s brother and his wife from Ontario will be in the Fraser Valley for a week)
– visit by friends from Ontario
– celebrating Ron’s 65th birthday J
– driving to Alberta to play/supervise/child sit while Tim and Joanne await the arrival of their third child due in December.
– large Kopp family gathering after Christmas at Camp Evergreen, just north of Calgary.
– our kids and grandkids coming to be with us for New Years.
– one week holiday in Mexico in January with Martha’s brother and sister-in-law.

Please do keep in touch – we are interested in what is happening in your lives.

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca

What have we appreciated and what is in the immediate future. (3rd and last in a series of three)…

August 25, 2013

This end-of-5 year-term BLOG series consists of:
–          What will we take back with us?
–          What we will gladly leave behind
–          What have we appreciated and what is in the immediate future (this week).

This BLOG could end up being a tome, if we allowed it. Some of these will have been topics of BLOG posts previously so we will mostly just list what we have appreciated in Kenya:
–          The wonderful stable weather of Nairobi.
–          Being near to the equator causes consistent hours of daylight and darkness. Wonderful!
–          The birds and their wake up calls every morning. A real chorus of sound.
–          Rich vegetation and wildlife including the abundant game parks. Something is flowering bushes/plants/trees all year round.
–          Being able to eat fresh ripe bananas and passion fruit from the trees/vines in our yard.
–          The friendliness of Kenyans, especially in rural Kenya where the sight of a muzungu (European or white skinned person) is still a novelty. The women that we encounter along the roadside selling vegetables from their gardens and other food stuffs when we walk to the office.
–          Willingness of people to identify themselves as people of faith and engage in faith discussions.
–          Being able to work with talented and committed partner organizations. Our partners have varying degree of capacity but we have generally seen a desire to increase and improve this capacity.
–          Seeing the impact of MCC’s development, relief and peace work on communities. This includes, but is not limited to, communities that now have access to water, grow drought resistant crops, are able to provide for themselves and their families.
–          An ethos that assumes that “if I have”, then “I will share”. This sometimes flies in the face of a “save a portion of all your income”. Instead, we will often hear people say that they cannot save if their neighbors or family member are in need.
–          New friends. We are reminded of this when it comes time to say good-bye.  In Africa, this needs to include a face-to-face encounter. An SMS or phone call doesn’t cut it. Our last few weeks are filled with these farewells. Sadly, there are some friends who we had to prematurely say “kwaheri”. We are especially reminded of Joshua Mukusya, a friend murdered almost 2 years ago. It is too bad that we cannot say a personal farewell to him. As we examine the stats of BLOG posts read most frequently, the Joshua’s funeral BLOG post remains one of the “most viewed” even now (originally posted Sept 17, 2011).
–          Exposure to another culture – some of which causes us to be thankful for what we have in Canada, and some of which makes us realize that we have much to learn from this cultures.

Our immediate future includes:
–          Spending 3 days in Amsterdam with Dave & Janet.
–          Taking a tour of our home in Chilliwack which we have only seen on the internet, and which we purchased with help from Ron’s brother Dave and his wife Janet. They provided us with much needed on-site help. Yes, we owe them….
–          Visiting our aging mothers in Chilliwack and Coaldale.
–          Closing on, and moving into our new house after collecting our furniture that is in storage with our children and in a container on a ranch in Westerose, Alberta. Making our house our home.
–          Figuring out what we will do next. One of Ron’s friends just shared on linkedin that “while being king of semi-retirement was enjoyable for a while, he was now bored out of his gourd”. We want to avoid boredom so will be looking for something worthwhile to do.
–          Finding a church home.
–          Visiting with family, laughing, sharing….
–          Taking a break from weekly BLOGs. We have received some messages to continue BLOGing, but we will take a break with an occasional post to update our readers on our “settling” in Canada.
–          Thank you for your interest in our lives, your prayers for us, your communications.

May God bless you.

43rd wedding anniversay

43rd wedding anniversay

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca

What we will gladly leave behind. (2nd in a series of three)

August 18, 2013
Reading, Swimming, Tanning, Relaxing at Turtle Bay, Watamu, Kenya

Reading, Swimming, Tanning, Relaxing at Turtle Bay, Watamu, Kenya

We have just returned from five days at the coast – Turtle Bay Resort. It was a relaxing time.

This end-of-5 year-term BLOG series consists of:

–          What will we take back with us?

–          What we will gladly leave behind (this week).

–          What have we appreciated and what is in the immediate future.

We start again with the merely annoying: slow and intermittent internet service, which can be very frustrating. We must also say how thankful we are for the internet service that we do get. Being able to communicate with family and friends, see the grandkids tearing around, hearing them sing, and talking with them – even through the network interruptions/halts/restarts – is SO very much appreciated.

On the top of our main list is: Nairobi traffic. Our schedule is often dictated by “the Nairobi jam” and we do our best to either leave in the very early morning or try and time our encounters with the traffic. Sometimes, however, the encounters cannot be avoided. There is also a cycle to the jam – early in the month, after payday, traffic jams are worse as there are more cars on the street as people choose to use their vehicles. Police crackdowns on matatus (small public service vehicle vans with seating for 11 or 14 but who routinely carry many more) also contribute to the jams. Once there is a jam, all kinds of aberrant (Ron’s word) behavior occurs – vehicles driving on sidewalks, off-road, through any service station or other place that might give a few vehicle advantage. It gets worse in the rain. Stress level goes up. We will not miss the traffic.

Kenya has again been ranked as one of the most corrupt nations in the world according to http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/09/global-corruption-report-2013_n_3568242.html. Sadly, Kenya newly elected legislators recently tried to raise their salary to 84 times that of the average Kenyan, and 70 percent of those Kenyans surveyed reported giving bribes.  This corruption occurs at both the trivial as well as institutional and governmental level. The newly elected government is taking some steps to try and address this but it is systemic. We wish them well in their endeavors.

Women have a difficult role to fill. Although, many African women are proud of “all that they do” and describe themselves as “strong African women” it is encouraging to see some examples of men assisting women with physical labour. It seems that the younger generation is doing more of the “shared work”. However, there is still much “progress” to experience.

Africa Time. First a definition (from Wikipedia): African time (or Africa time) is the perceived cultural tendency, in most parts of Africa, toward a more relaxed attitude to time. This is sometimes used in a pejorative sense, about tardiness in appointments, meetings and events. This also includes the more leisurely, relaxed, and less rigorously-scheduled lifestyle found in African countries, especially as opposed to the more clock-bound pace of daily life in Western countries. As such it is similar to time orientations in some other non-Western culture regions.

In summary, we have not managed to adjust to the concept of Africa time. The western concept of being late indicating a certain level of disrespect for the one who is doing the waiting, is not something that is practiced here. Often Africa time is described as being committed to relationships and that spending time with people, at the expense of other appointments, is more important than the keeping of time commitments. As we said, we have not become accustomed to this. Our attitude towards time is often described as “mzungu time”. Africa time applies to church services, weddings (sometimes) and meetings in the office. We have had numerous discussions with African friends on this subject of Africa time trying to figure out how they know when to come to a meeting/service or wedding. For a wedding scheduled to begin at 10:00 a.m., the vast majority of Kenyan invitees arrived at 1:30 p.m., in time for the ceremony to begin. How did they know that even though the invitation said 10:00 a.m., that this was code for 1:30 p.m? It is a code that we have not mastered.

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca

What “learnings” we take with us (1st in a series of three)…

August 12, 2013
Wildebeast cross the Mara River

Wildebeast cross the Mara River

This BLOG is late due to events beyond our control. These included a fire at the Nairobi airport which impacted the arrival times for Ron’s brother Dave and his wife Janet who joined us for our last trip to the Maasai Mara.

This end-of-5 year-term series consists of:

–          What “learnings” we take with us.

–          What we will gladly leave behind.

–          What have we appreciated and what is in the immediate future.

During our 5 years in Kenya we have had many visitors. These include family members, (who either came to stay with us or were part of an organized tour group), MCC visitors, Learning tours or Work and Learn Tours. One group of visitors that visited us several times were Brethren in Christ(BIC) visitors.  Both times that this group visited, they asked us a set of questions that were “new” , in the sense that they asked penetrating questions that had not been asked of us before.

The BIC group visited again early in July and at our wrap-up dinner – at Java House J — they asked “so, what practice, or observation, or learning, will you take with you on your return to North America and continue with it?”. Hmmmm…..

Just because a question is difficult, doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be answered. So, we will try in this post.

First the trivial: we have become accustomed to “heating milk to ‘almost boiling but not quite’’ to add to our coffee. Heated milk is mixed with tea, sometimes with addition of ginger or other spices, to make chai which is served at breakfast, morning tea and afternoon tea. We adopted the “heating milk” practice for coffee and quite enjoy it.

Now to the more meaningful: Our life here is simpler than it has been. We have read more than we ever have. Eating habits, gadgets, clothes, general lifestyle, are all simpler. We would like to remain living simply – however challenging that might be.

Helping the needy: Seeing the lifestyle of so many who struggle just to get an education for their children, put meager food on the table, establish shelter, maintain health – all are challenges. We have been humbled in being able to assist, not with hand-outs/aid, but rather assisting people to learn how to sustain their own livelihoods. This experience in Kenya causes us to ask different, and hopefully better, questions about charity, how to help, how or if to designate, and which organizations do effective work, impacting the life of the truly needy. Another face to face challenge – that of doing enough investigation and verification to ensure that the recipient is truly needy. There are many stories to tell…. We are seen as having much – and we do have much – but this does not obliterate the need to do the necessary assessment work. We will encourage others as well to make sure that the assessment work gets done.

Fans of MCC: Seeing firsthand how and where MCC works – and being able to have a hand in defining that – is something that we want to take with us and stay involved with. We sense that some of our churches have lost the connection to MCC. We want to take the connection that we have made back with us.

Working together: Mostly, we have enjoyed doing this job together. While we have had “our days” and while working “as a couple” doing the same job brings its challenges. We would say that on the whole, it has been rewarding and enjoyable. We have seen each other shine in areas where we are gifted – we also see how we perform in areas where we are not as gifted.

Next week – another installment.

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca

Final road trip to western Kenya …

August 3, 2013

The week began with a farewell at one of the Nairobi Mennonite churches with lots of singing, worship and receiving some gifts. We will carry back to Canada the wishes and prayers of this congregation.

Martha with Stanley

Martha with Stanley

Mzee and his new walking stick

Mzee and his new walking stick

Martha and her new purse

Martha and her new purse

We are now back in Nairobi after a full and worthwhile, we think, visit to western Kenya. We left early Thursday for Kisumu, arriving there in time for a meeting at 2 p.m. For the first time, in all our road trips, we experienced some vehicle trouble with our trusty Landcruiser. We had trouble with overheating on the entire trip and experienced some of the help provided by Kenyans along the road. We fully realize that the “help” is given because of an anticipated reward, but nevertheless, a number of “helper mechanics”  — called fundis  — were quick to come to our assistance.

While in the Kisumu area, we met with several groups, including the bishops of the Kenya Mennonite Church, an HIV/AIDs project, and a food security/education/greenhouse/dairy goat/peace project late one afternoon. We stayed overnight in Kisumu and Kericho and then “babied” our Landcruiser back to Nairobi after getting advice from our regular mechanic. We made it home safely, albeit a bit slowly. Part of next week’s agenda is now to fix the vehicle.

We travelled with Rand and Selena Carpenter and their two children Reid and Sam. Here are a few pictures from our trip.

Meeting with Kenya Mennonite Church bishops

Meeting with Kenya Mennonite Church bishops

Wheat fields and acacia trees

Wheat fields and acacia trees

Majestic acacia tree

Majestic acacia tree

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca

Moving day and week …

July 27, 2013

Regular readers will have seen several pictures of our deck, our yard, the vegetation surrounding where we live and the birds that wake us up every morning and fully use our bird bath and bird feeders. With development plans underway for the property on which our house is located, we needed to find alternate housing for our replacements.

During one of our weekend walks, we noticed “For Let” signs on several properties. We viewed a number of them and found a suitable, spacious apartment within a ten minute walk of our office. We signed a lease several months ago and have been slowly furnishing it. On Friday of this week, we booked a mover with a small truck, and moved almost all of the MCC furniture from our current house into the apartment. As you can see, the furniture was spread out on our yard and it took only two loads – albeit very overloaded loads – along with two trips with our Landcruiser for the fragile items – to move all the furniture. Where we really appreciated the help was hauling all the furniture up four flights of stairs at the new location.

Not much left -- real simple living

Not much left — real simple living

It means that we now live in a very sparsely furnished house, with a 2 burner counter-top unit, a small fridge and some furniture from EMM.

Our two burner cooker which needs to last us for the month

Our two burner cooker which needs to last us for the month

Starting to load

Starting to load

Big things first

Big things first

The apartment is ready for our replacements and we will meet them at the airport Sunday evening. We then begin with a series of introductory visits to partners including a trip to western Kenya.

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca

Quilting project…

July 20, 2013
Rosemary and Jane

Rosemary and Jane

This past weekend and week has seen a quilting project occur in our home and front yard. It has prompted visits by neighbours and guests who ask “what is going on”. What is going on is that Martha is helping some women learn how to quilt. Jane works with groups of women – 25 at a time – who embark on a 3 month training session which includes topics such as family planning, women’s health, and income generating. Rosemary is one of the women from the slum who helps Jane do the training. The women who participate in the training live in Korogocho slum – more information can be seen at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korogocho.

Martha started Jane and Rosemary on a small project using a rather large quilting frame that had been donated by a friend.

They then prepared to quilt a full-sized quilt.

Martha, Jane and Rosemary preparing for the larger quilt

Martha, Jane and Rosemary preparing for the larger quilt

The frame was set up in our front yard and several days were spent learning, undoing, redoing and finding out “what makes a good stitch and quilt”. Some days they worked most of the afternoon.

???????????????????????????????

There was some finishing up to do.

And then there was one

And then there was one

Working into the darkness

Working into the darkness

We tried to get the quilt (still on the frame) into the house but it was too big to make it through the doorway. So we rolled up the quilt, took the frame apart and stored it in a spare bedroom awaiting the next session. It will be interesting to see the end result and what income can be generated by the group of women, mostly HIV positive women.

It seems that there are a number of projects “still to be done” or us being asked “to do” before we leave. With our replacements arriving in a week, the “end of term” is almost upon us.

Have a good week,

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca

Visit to Mukuru…

July 13, 2013

One of the projects that MCC supports in Nairobi is located in one of the slums. As the administrator of Mukuru Menno Academy says, “this is called Embakasi or Mukuru slum”. When asked about the number of people in the slum, the answer is “many”. According to estimates, in excess of 600,000 people call this area home.  Most of these people have left their rural homes because of poverty and came to the city in the hope of finding work in nearby factories in the “industrial area”. Some are successful but, for the majority, being unskilled and uneducated, they remain jobless. They live in shacks made from cardboard or plastic material while those who are a little better off have houses made from corrugated iron sheets. These one-roomed houses are approximately ten by ten feet and have no sanitation or running water. There is no waste collection and most of the waste, household and other, goes directly into the nearby Ngong River. About 60% of Nairobi’s population live in slum conditions like those found in Mukuru. Slum dwellers pay rent for their shacks to landlords who ‘own’ the land. There are very few spaces for children to play. There are few recreation facilities for adults or children with the exception of bars, video shops, pool tables. Many turn to local brew, drugs and crime, against this background, places like Embakasi Mennonite Church, which shares it’s compound with the Mukuru primary school, is making an impact implementing a program of education, sanitation, hygiene and water to assist the pupils, their families and the broader community.

A church group from Manitoba, connected to MCC, provided funds for the building of two additional classrooms. For more information on the Mukuru Menno Academy project, you can go to http://globalfamily.mcc.org/programs/kenya/mukuru-mennonite-academy

Here are some pictures from our visit to Mukuru Menno Academy this past week.

Newly constructed classrooms funded by Manitoba church group -- friends of MCC

Newly constructed classrooms funded by Manitoba church group — friends of MCC

Teacher Abigal and her nursery class

Teacher Abigal and her nursery class

New latrines as part of the Water/Sanitation & Hygiene project

New latrines as part of the Water/Sanitation & Hygiene project

Here is a picture of Martha and her Mom during Martha’s visit to Coaldale a few weeks ago.

Martha and her Mom

Martha and her Mom

Our email addresses are martharatzlaff@gmail.com and ronratzlaff@yahoo.ca